Adventures of Robo-Kid
by De Groat, Diane






In this action-packed book with two intersecting stories-one set in the real world and one inside a comic book-a real-life kid finds the courage to cope with his anxiety with the help of a comic superhero who has his own vulnerabilities. Illustrations.





Diane deGroat is the illustrator of more than 150 children's books and the author-illustrator of bestselling books about Gilbert, including Ants in Your Pants, Worm in Your Pants (Gilbert Goes Green); April Fool! Watch Out at School!; Mother, You're the Best! (But Sister, You're a Pest!); Last One is a Rotten Egg!; and the New York Times bestseller Roses Are Pink, Your Feet Really Stink. Most recently she has worked on the Charlie the Ranch Dog series by popular blogger Ree Drummond. Diane lives in Amherst, Massachusetts.





A comic-book hero and a real boy share an adventure. In the opening pages, Robo-Kid successfully averts a disaster. Then the frames of a comic book give way to the surroundings of a young, light-skinned boy absorbed in the story as a voice calls, "Ready for your swimming lesson, Henry?" Henry slams the comic book closed and tucks it into his backpack, and Robo-Kid rubs their head. "I hate when they do that," remarks Robo-Kid, a round-headed figure who appears to be made of interlocking blocks. As Henry approaches the community center, Robo-Kid complains to their robot family at the dinner table-"Why can't I be a superhero in the real world?" The juxtaposition of the comic-book frames of Robo-Kid's experiences with spreads depicting Henry's is excellent, with deGroat's crisp, engaging art rendering both characters' worlds in clear lines and bright colors. Robo-Kid senses that they are needed-it's evident from Henry's worried face that he's not entirely confident about swimming-and hops into Henry's world. When Robo-Kid leaps into the pool, it's Henry to the rescue. An image of a triumphant Henry holding his swimming certificate and the account Robo-Kid gives to the family about their adventure in the "real world" emphasize the heroics of both characters, each entitled to feel successful. (This book was reviewed digitally.) A super blend of everyday courage, the inner lives of readers, and rising to the challenge of doing something difficult. (Picture book. 4-8) Copyright Kirkus 2022 Kirkus/BPI Communications. All rights reserved.





A comic-book hero and a real boy share an adventure. In the opening pages, Robo-Kid successfully averts a disaster. Then the frames of a comic book give way to the surroundings of a young, light-skinned boy absorbed in the story as a voice calls, "Ready for your swimming lesson, Henry?" Henry slams the comic book closed and tucks it into his backpack, and Robo-Kid rubs their head. "I hate when they do that," remarks Robo-Kid, a round-headed figure who appears to be made of interlocking blocks. As Henry approaches the community center, Robo-Kid complains to their robot family at the dinner table-"Why can't I be a superhero in the real world?" The juxtaposition of the comic-book frames of Robo-Kid's experiences with spreads depicting Henry's is excellent, with deGroat's crisp, engaging art rendering both characters' worlds in clear lines and bright colors. Robo-Kid senses that they are needed-it's evident from Henry's worried face that he's not entirely confident about swimming-and hops into Henry's world. When Robo-Kid leaps into the pool, it's Henry to the rescue. An image of a triumphant Henry holding his swimming certificate and the account Robo-Kid gives to the family about their adventure in the "real world" emphasize the heroics of both characters, each entitled to feel successful. (This book was reviewed digitally.) A super blend of everyday courage, the inner lives of readers, and rising to the challenge of doing something difficult. (Picture book. 4-8) Copyright Kirkus 2022 Kirkus/BPI Communications. All rights reserved.






Terms of Use   ©Copyright 2022 Follett School Solutions