Servants of the Damned : Giant Law Firms, Donald Trump, and the Corruption of Justice
by Enrich, David







Author's Notexiii
Prologue: Power Play1(12)
PART I
1 A Hustling Business
13(9)
2 The Independence Principle
22(8)
3 A Truly National Firm
30(4)
4 Advertisers-at-Law
34(13)
5 Creating a Monster
47(13)
6 Keeping Up with the Jones Days
60(7)
7 The Greatest Client
67(14)
8 Aiding and Abetting
81(11)
9 Judas Day
92(13)
PART II
10 The Full Fredo
105(8)
11 Try to Save the Culture
113(11)
12 Rogue Lawyers
124(13)
13 Burning the Envelope
137(16)
14 Make It Go Away
153(9)
15 Psychological Combat
162(12)
16 Dirty, Dirty, Dirty
174(13)
17 Lurching to the Right
187(20)
PART III
18 The Bloody Eighth
207(8)
19 Trump's Stallion
215(7)
20 You Can Count Me In
222(6)
21 A Lawless Hobbesian Nightmare
228(7)
22 A Nice Little Cushion
235(9)
23 Rich, Pissed Off, and Wrong
244(9)
24 Subsidizing Trump
253(9)
25 Bizarre Coincidences
262(5)
26 Redefining Shamefulness
267(15)
27 No Vacancy Left Behind
282(7)
28 Fearmongering
289(8)
29 We Dissent
297(6)
Epilogue: The Black Book303(10)
Acknowledgments313(4)
Notes317(36)
Index353


"From the New York Times's Business Investigations Editor and #1 bestselling author of Dark Towers comes a long-overdue expos‚e of the astonishing yet shadowy power wielded by the world's largest law firms, following the narrative arc of Jones Day, the firm that represented the Trump campaign and much of the Fortune 500, as a powerful encapsulation of the changes that have swept the legal industry in recent decades"-





Why isn't Donald Trump in prison? Perhaps because he has one of the country's foremost law firms at his back. Longtime Trump-watcher Enrich, the New York Times business investigations editor and author of Dark Towers: Deutsche Bank, Donald Trump, and an Epic Trail of Destruction, moves from finance to law in this account of Jones Day, a legal firm that expanded in D.C. over the last few decades in order to weave itself into "the fabric of the capital's conservative firmament." Founded in the 1890s in Cleveland, the company had always been conservative. However, under the guidance of principal Steve Brogan, it has turned increasingly hard right, "a champion of right-wing politics, organizing legal challenges to Obama's health care program, white-collar prosecutions, government regulations, and voting rights laws." Much of this turn involved Don McGahn, who was Trump's in-house counsel for a couple of years until falling out over the Mueller Report. McGahn and his mentor, Ben Ginsberg, had not expected Trump to win, and they believed that Trump would convert his campaign into "an influence-buying PAC" that Jones Day would manage. "More than five years later," when Trump lost decisively in the 2020 election, "the PACs were all that was left, and Jones Day was their law firm," still exercising tremendous influence over Republican politics. The firm bought into Trump's claims of electoral fraud, though not without some internal dissent. As the author shows, Jones Day-which had previously represented massive pharmaceutical and tobacco companies and the sex scandal-ridden Catholic Church-was vigorous in "trying to stop votes from being counted-not because they thought there was something improper underway (there was zero evidence of that), but because they detected an opportunity to use the law to give their side a political edge." There are plenty of other shameful episodes, and Enrich is unblinking in reporting them, yielding a fast-moving, damning book. Essential reading for students of the Trump corruption machine. Copyright Kirkus 2022 Kirkus/BPI Communications. All rights reserved.






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