Diana, William, and Harry : The Most Heartbreaking Story of Our Time - Diana's Life As a Princess and a Mother
by Patterson, James; Mooney, Chris







Prologue3(4)
Part 1 Lady Diana
7(36)
Part 2 Charles and Di
43(36)
Part 3 Mummy
79(44)
Part 4 Princess of Wales
123(50)
Part 5 The People's Princess
173(48)
Part 6 The Heir and the Spare
221(34)
Part 7 Cadets Wales
255(50)
Part 8 Officers and Gentlemen
305(46)
Part 9 The Cambridges and the Sussexes
351(41)
Epilogue392(3)
Notes395


The world's best-selling author examines the heartbreaking story of Princess Diana, taken from her sons William and Harry at a painfully young age, and how they carried on her name and spirit into adulthood. 300,000 first printing.





James Patterson is the world's bestselling author. The creator of Alex Cross, he has produced more enduring fictional heroes than any other novelist alive. He lives in Florida with his family.

Chris Mooney is the international bestselling author of fourteen thrillers. The Mystery Writers of America nominated Remembering Sarah for an Edgar Award. He teaches creative writing at Harvard.





Unfolding like fiction and relying on quotes from its principal characters, this narrative version of the lives of Diana, Princess of Wales and her two sons, William and Harry, comes out just in time to mark the twenty-fifth anniversary of Diana's death. The mother-and-sons biography begins when Diana is a young teenager and continues through early 2022. Brief chapters (124 of them) generally reprise milestones in the characters' personal lives. The present tense text, including imagined dialogue and inner thoughts, may lend immediacy to stories that royal watchers will already be familiar with (and for further reading they can consult the almost 50 pages of notes). With a respectful, empathetic tone, the book doesn't offer much commentary nor a whole lot of new material. Occasional flip-flopping between present and past tense and a few abrupt interruptions when new chapters take off in different directions can cause some confusion, but none of these details will matter to Diana devotees and Patterson's hordes of fans. The review copy did not include an author's note or any insights into why Patterson and coauthor Mooney decided to pursue this topic, but there's bound to be significant publicity and reader curiosity. Copyright 2022 Booklist Reviews.





Unfolding like fiction and relying on quotes from its principal characters, this narrative version of the lives of Diana, Princess of Wales and her two sons, William and Harry, comes out just in time to mark the twenty-fifth anniversary of Diana's death. The mother-and-sons biography begins when Diana is a young teenager and continues through early 2022. Brief chapters (124 of them) generally reprise milestones in the characters' personal lives. The present tense text, including imagined dialogue and inner thoughts, may lend immediacy to stories that royal watchers will already be familiar with (and for further reading they can consult the almost 50 pages of notes). With a respectful, empathetic tone, the book doesn't offer much commentary nor a whole lot of new material. Occasional flip-flopping between present and past tense and a few abrupt interruptions when new chapters take off in different directions can cause some confusion, but none of these details will matter to Diana devotees and Patterson's hordes of fans. The review copy did not include an author's note or any insights into why Patterson and coauthor Mooney decided to pursue this topic, but there's bound to be significant publicity and reader curiosity. Copyright 2022 Booklist Reviews.





The Patterson juggernaut continues to expand into the nonfiction world with this account of the royal family. Given that bookshelves are full of stories about the House of Windsor, is there anything more to be said about the shattered family of Diana, Princess of Wales (1961-1997)? Patterson thinks yes-and proves it-in this narrative about the lives of Diana, William, and Harry. Numerous authors have written about Diana the victim, Diana the fashion icon, and Diana the "people's princess," but Patterson explores an aspect of the late Lady Di that offers more fertile ground for investigation: Diana the mother. Starting from a young age, Diana Frances Spencer displayed an uncanny ability to put people at ease, and her clear love of children set the stage for her most important role, that of "Mummy." Amid all the recent Diana content, from Netflix shows to films, Patterson does something different. He treats the princess as a person and tells the story of a mother from her perspective. In fascinating morsels, we learn of the empathetic heart underneath the diamond brooches and couture gowns. Diana struggled with issues many face-including mental health, frosty in-laws, and a doomed marriage-and Patterson treats his subject with compassion and an admiring acknowledgement of Diana's rebellious side. However, the book loses momentum after Diana's death. We see how sons William and Harry assumed their roles in the royal family without their mother's guidance. By this point, Diana's impressive humanitarian efforts give way to her sons' social lives and military careers. In spite of efforts to keep Diana top of mind, the narrative becomes less vibrant once Diana is no longer in it. As the sons drift apart, the book leaves us with the heartbreaking question of what might have been. A good choice for readers who can't get enough of Diana. Copyright Kirkus 2022 Kirkus/BPI Communications. All rights reserved.





The Patterson juggernaut continues to expand into the nonfiction world with this account of the royal family. Given that bookshelves are full of stories about the House of Windsor, is there anything more to be said about the shattered family of Diana, Princess of Wales (1961-1997)? Patterson thinks yes-and proves it-in this narrative about the lives of Diana, William, and Harry. Numerous authors have written about Diana the victim, Diana the fashion icon, and Diana the "people's princess," but Patterson explores an aspect of the late Lady Di that offers more fertile ground for investigation: Diana the mother. Starting from a young age, Diana Frances Spencer displayed an uncanny ability to put people at ease, and her clear love of children set the stage for her most important role, that of "Mummy." Amid all the recent Diana content, from Netflix shows to films, Patterson does something different. He treats the princess as a person and tells the story of a mother from her perspective. In fascinating morsels, we learn of the empathetic heart underneath the diamond brooches and couture gowns. Diana struggled with issues many face-including mental health, frosty in-laws, and a doomed marriage-and Patterson treats his subject with compassion and an admiring acknowledgement of Diana's rebellious side. However, the book loses momentum after Diana's death. We see how sons William and Harry assumed their roles in the royal family without their mother's guidance. By this point, Diana's impressive humanitarian efforts give way to her sons' social lives and military careers. In spite of efforts to keep Diana top of mind, the narrative becomes less vibrant once Diana is no longer in it. As the sons drift apart, the book leaves us with the heartbreaking question of what might have been. A good choice for readers who can't get enough of Diana. Copyright Kirkus 2022 Kirkus/BPI Communications. All rights reserved.






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