Terror in the City of Champions : Murder, Baseball, and the Secret Society That Shocked Depression-Era Detroit
by Stanton, Tom







Prologuexi
Part I Something Afoot, 1933-1934
Mickey and Dayton
3(12)
A Friend Disappears
15(1)
Spring in Lakeland
16(6)
Major-General Bert
22(8)
A Future Together
30(2)
The Bee Is Buzzing
32(4)
Neither Threats Nor Bribes
36(7)
It Hurt for Days
43(9)
The Little Stone Chapel
52(8)
The Superstitious Schoolboy and His Gal
60(9)
Happy Rosh Hashanah, Hank
69(8)
Oh, Those Dean Boys
77(10)
The Attorney down the Street
87(14)
Part II Grand Plans, 1935
A New Year
101(2)
Mr. Hoover, Investigate
103(10)
Harry's Caravan
113(8)
The Radio Priest
121(7)
The Killing of Silas Coleman
128(7)
Worries
135(10)
Unwanted Attention
145(8)
Zero Hour
153(6)
Louis vs. Baer
159(6)
World Champions
165(13)
Amid the Joy, Punishment
178(4)
The Pastor Who Said No
182(7)
Uncle Frank
189(3)
Come to Detroit, Lindbergh
192(11)
Part III Joy and Terror, 1936
Case Closed
203(11)
City of Champions
214(8)
Rumors
222(8)
Poole and Pidcock
230(6)
Secrets
236(8)
Black Legion Hysteria
244(11)
Frenzied Nerves
255(2)
Dayton Dean and the Negro Reporter
257(3)
The Captain
260(7)
Wyoming
267(3)
The Cover-Up
270(7)
Epilogue277(6)
Acknowledgments283(2)
Notes285(24)
Bibliography309(6)
Index315(14)
About the Author329


A rich portrayal of 1930s Detroit and the influence of Klan-affiliated white supremacist group Black Legion traces the pivotal roles of prominent politicians and citizens, including gun-loving baseball fan Dayton Dean, fiery baseball star Mickey Cochrane and FBI pioneer J. Edgar Hoover.





Tom Stanton is the author of several nonfiction books, among them the critically acclaimed memoir The Final Season and the Quill Award finalist Ty and The Babe. A longtime journalist, he teaches at the University of Detroit Mercy. Stanton co-founded and edited the suburban Detroit Voice newspapers, winning state and national press awards, including a Knight-Wallace Fellowship at the University of Michigan. He and wife Beth Bagley-Stanton live in New Baltimore, Michigan.





*Starred Review* If you're looking for a book that combines sports, crime, and history in one package, look no further. Stanton, who's written or contributed to several books about baseball, examines a fascinating period in the history of the sport, the mid-1930s. It was a time when Detroit was, generally speaking, a sports powerhouse: the Lions, Tigers, and Red Wings (football, baseball, and hockey, respectively) were champions during the same three-year period; Joe Louis, an up-and-coming local boxer, was starting to generate some serious publicity. But it was also a time when the Black Legion, a massive white-supremacist criminal organization similar in structure and philosophy to the Ku Klux Klan, was terrorizing and murdering men of the church, union leaders, and various other perceived enemies. Stanton tells this big story by focusing on two key players: Mickey Cochrane, newly appointed manager to the Tigers, and Dayton Dean, a Black Legion member whose guilty plea in a murder case led to a massive law-enforcement effort to bring the Legion to its knees. For fans of books about baseball, Depression-era American history, and crime nonfiction, this book is a must-read. Copyright 2014 Booklist Reviews.





A veteran journalist uses a variety of lenses to illuminate the dark story of the Black Legion, an association of murderous (white) domestic terrorists who briefly thrived in the upper Midwest. Stanton (Journalism/Univ. of Detroit; Ty and the Babe: Baseball's Fiercest Rivals, 2007) unfolds the history of the Legion gradually, always keeping it in the social, cultural, and economic context of the area where it was born and grew: the territory around western Lake Erie. Although the author tells us about the horrors perpetrated by the Legion (whippings, intimidations, murders), he follows other stories closely: the rise of boxer Joe Louis and the phenomenal year of 1935 for Detroit's professional athletic teams-the Tigers, Lions, and Red Wings all won championships. Stanton gives the Tigers the most attention, especially their player-manager, catcher Mickey Cochrane, a ferocious competitor who eventually crumbled into a nervous breakdown. Hank Greenberg, the first Jewish b aseball star, also is often front and center. And there are cameos for a couple of future U.S. presidents (football star Gerald Ford, courted by the Lions, and Ronald Reagan, a broadcaster at the time). It's evident throughout that the author assiduously researched his project; he seems to have read every newspaper and magazine account of the events and to have walked the blood-soaked ground (he ends with a visit to a relevant cemetery). Stanton is also quite clear about the corrosive political and law enforcement corruption that enabled the Black Legion to commit their atrocities without much blowback. "Numerous city figures and their followers belonged," he writes, "including a councilman, police officers, and fire officials. Their biases spread along a spiteful scale from serious...to silly." In 1936, however, a group of diligent cops began investigating and arresting, and the whole house of cards toppled very quickly-though, as Stanton points out, many murders r emain unsolved and crime scenes uninvestigated. First-rate reporting and a seminar in how to employ context in investigative and historical journalism. Copyright Kirkus 2016 Kirkus/BPI Communications. All rights reserved.






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