Dinners With Ruth : A Memoir on the Power of Friendships
by Totenberg, Nina







Prologue Bouillabaisse for Ruthix
One The First Stirrings of Friendship
1(40)
Two Making Friends and a Few Enemies
41(11)
Three Unexpected Friends
52(10)
Four Friends and Love
62(14)
Five Friends in Need
76(19)
Six Friends of the Court
95(11)
Seven Friends and Confidences
106(15)
Eight Supreme Friends
121(24)
Nine Male Friends
145(14)
Ten Friends in Joy
159(19)
Eleven Nourishing Friendships
178(11)
Twelve Friendship and Hardships
189(14)
Thirteen Fame and Friendship
203(16)
Fourteen Friendship Is a Choice
219(12)
Fifteen Losing Friends
231(14)
Sixteen Finding My Father's Long-Lost Friend
245(12)
Seventeen Farewell to My Friend
257(14)
Epilogue271(10)
Notes281(8)
Acknowledgments289(2)
Photo Credits291(2)
Index293


In this moving story of the joy and true meaning of friendship, NPR's award-winning legal affairs correspondent recounts her nearly 50-year friendship with Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg, presenting an extraordinary account of how they paved the way for future generations by tearing down professional and legal barriers.





Nina Totenberg is NPR's award-winning legal affairs correspondent. She appears on NPR's critically acclaimed news magazines All Things Considered, Morning Edition, and Weekend Edition, and on NPR podcasts, including The NPR Politics Podcast and its series, The Docket. Totenberg's Supreme Court and legal coverage has won her every major journalism award in broadcasting. Recognized seven times by the American Bar Association for continued excellence in legal reporting, she has received more than two dozen honorary degrees. A frequent TV contributor, she writes for major newspapers, magazines, and law reviews.





*Starred Review* Longtime NPR legal affairs correspondent Nina Totenberg shares the engrossing and engaging story of her friendship with the late Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg. It's not surprising that these two powerful women became close confidants, despite very different upbringings. Both women came of age in the 1970s, a time when women were attempting to gain access to careers previously dominated by men. Totenberg and Ginsburg both often found themselves to be the only women in the room, and it was inevitable that their paths would cross. The author's smooth storytelling style effectively blends recaps of their developing relationship with landmark judicial decisions and political events. She offers fresh insights into the dealings of Capitol Hill and the Supreme Court, but her personal anecdotes (she and Ginsburg once skipped a conference to go shopping; Ginsburg officiated at Totenberg's wedding), her numerous shout-outs to other women who helped her in her career, and her musings about the nature of friendship are the most compelling parts. Totenberg's story includes triumphs and failures, good times and bad, and a poignant account of Ginsburg's final illnesses and death. Expect considerable publicity and lots of well-deserved demand. Copyright 2022 Booklist Reviews.





Longtime NPR correspondent Totenberg recounts her friendship with the late Supreme Court justice. Many readers may not know that Ruth Bader Ginsburg (1933-2020) studied literature with the noted (and notorious) Russian novelist Vladimir Nabokov at Cornell, "where she truly came alive." What Totenberg and Ginsburg shared over a half-century friendship, much spent over bowls of bouillabaisse, was a profound love of conversation and learning, to say nothing of the law, to which Totenberg had a sort of trial by fire, covering, among many other events, the Clarence Thomas confirmation hearings. "For understandable reasons," she writes, "he's never granted me an interview, and when we attend the same social events, I keep my distance." Ginsburg was a devoted student and thoughtful interpreter of the law, which made her invaluable as a member of the court. As the author writes, she also had a gift for being "able to separate fierce intellectual disagreements from personal animus," which helps explain why the aforementioned Thomas, with whom she often disagreed, paid deeply felt tribute to her after her death. Indeed, counseled Ginsburg, "It helps, sometimes, to be a little deaf when unkind or thoughtless words are spoken." She has been honored and eulogized countless times since her death in 2020, but, Totenberg reminds us, while Ginsburg sought points of common ground in developing arguments and dissents, she was still the victim of partisan politics. In a typically nasty move, Mitch McConnell denied her a place lying in state in the Capitol Rotunda, which the Senate controls, and she was honored in Statuary Hall, the purview of the House. McConnell did not attend. "Even as many conservatives will welcome a far more conservative, some might say extreme, Court," Totenberg closes, meaningfully, "many in America may well be surprised to miss a more centrist Court, as they will miss RGB." An affectionate, revealing portrait of an important figure in American history. Copyright Kirkus 2022 Kirkus/BPI Communications. All rights reserved.





Longtime NPR correspondent Totenberg recounts her friendship with the late Supreme Court justice. Many readers may not know that Ruth Bader Ginsburg (1933-2020) studied literature with the noted (and notorious) Russian novelist Vladimir Nabokov at Cornell, "where she truly came alive." What Totenberg and Ginsburg shared over a half-century friendship, much spent over bowls of bouillabaisse, was a profound love of conversation and learning, to say nothing of the law, to which Totenberg had a sort of trial by fire, covering, among many other events, the Clarence Thomas confirmation hearings. "For understandable reasons," she writes, "he's never granted me an interview, and when we attend the same social events, I keep my distance." Ginsburg was a devoted student and thoughtful interpreter of the law, which made her invaluable as a member of the court. As the author writes, she also had a gift for being "able to separate fierce intellectual disagreements from personal animus," which helps explain why the aforementioned Thomas, with whom she often disagreed, paid deeply felt tribute to her after her death. Indeed, counseled Ginsburg, "It helps, sometimes, to be a little deaf when unkind or thoughtless words are spoken." She has been honored and eulogized countless times since her death in 2020, but, Totenberg reminds us, while Ginsburg sought points of common ground in developing arguments and dissents, she was still the victim of partisan politics. In a typically nasty move, Mitch McConnell denied her a place lying in state in the Capitol Rotunda, which the Senate controls, and she was honored in Statuary Hall, the purview of the House. McConnell did not attend. "Even as many conservatives will welcome a far more conservative, some might say extreme, Court," Totenberg closes, meaningfully, "many in America may well be surprised to miss a more centrist Court, as they will miss RGB." An affectionate, revealing portrait of an important figure in American history. Copyright Kirkus 2022 Kirkus/BPI Communications. All rights reserved.






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